Nicole. Female. German that doesn't speak good German. Currently watching: Spartacus
Str8 h8

leggies:

au where achilles is a super famous olympic, nike-sponsored sprinter who like models and lies around naked with his medals on all day

and patroclus is just an overworked, insomniac-ish male nurse who grew up next door to achilles and worked really hard to get a scholarship for college and like everyone at the hospital ADORES him

and achilles hates doctors, needles, anything of that ilk so patroclus is literally the only person who can placate and treat him, and in return achilles makes comments about how hot patroclus looks in scrubs and sexts him while he’s at work saving lives n shit

ratatit:

i aspire to get to that level of hot where my hair looks like shit and i smell like black coffee and yesterday’s eyeliner is smudged under my eyes but i still look fine as hell

stand-up-comic-gifs:

Baron Vaughn (x)

help-me-yes:

white people talking about other ethnicities be like
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white people talking about themselves be like
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sazquatch:

The huge amount of pressure on young girls to let their boyfriends get away with everything and not to stand up for themselves, lest they stop being a ‘chill girlfriend’ and instead become a horrible, controlling harpy is such bullshit.

Stop teaching young girls that demanding to be treated with respect and courtesy makes them shrill, over-emotional, or unworthy of listening to.

privilegetoengtranslationservice:

sexualremarks:

pyonkotchi:

if you think black women wearing their hair natural is unprofessional you are racist.

if a white woman worked in a store with hair she hadnt brushed and called it her “natural” hair it would still be unprofessional.

Translation:

A black woman’s natural hair is of the same quality as a white woman’s unkempt hair.

nadiaoxford:

cannonbarrage:

nadiaoxford:

I submit the intro for Hunchback of Notre Dame beats Circle of Life raw.

Especially since the former doesn’t have flocks of pink birds that immediately make me think, “Sure, Disney, you weren’t influenced at all by Osamu Tezuka. Tell us another one.”

This movie was surprisingly hardcore for a Disney retelling of Victor Hugo’s really screwed up story.

It also did a ton of great stuff with God and religion and Catholicism that somehow managed to still be about people and not bring “Why Religion Sucks” into the whole thing, which is aces.

One thing that surprises me is how well the animation has aged. Strangely enough, it looked weird at the time; we weren’t really used to traditional animation blended with computer backgrounds. But now that pretty much everything is computer animated, you can really appreciate how effin’ gorgeous the Cathedral backgrounds are.

Also, God Help the Outcasts is the most honest song featured in a Disney movie. “Honest” meaning it doesn’t feel manufactured specifically to be played in a suburbanite van ferrying kids to McDonalds. It’s raw, open, and genuine.

(Needless to say, there is nothing suburban about Hellfire, ho ho ho. Will we ever again see a Disney villain essentially sing, “Help me Mary, I have an unholy erection?”)

chickenstab:

halloween’s coming early on tumblr

halloweewee:

BOYS AND GIRLS OF EVERY AGE

[SMASHES THROUGH YOUR WINDOW]

WOULDN’T YOU LIKE TO SEE SOMETHING STRANGE

[PUNCHES A WALL]

COME WITH US AND YOU WILL SEE

[BREAKS ALL OF YOUR ANTIQUE PHOTOS]

THIS OUR TOWN OF HALLOWEEN

diabeteswithowls:

"he or she" …they?

"he/she" they

"(s)he" thEY

littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.image

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LOOKimage

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LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONEimage

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LOOK

I wanna watch in the flesh really bad cause I started it and it was good but I know Simon pops up eventually and I’ve seen how often he embarrasses himself and I don’t know if I can handle it??

gaydicks420:

the sims 4 announcements are so bleak and depressing out of context 

zayrn:

there’s literally no point in teaching girls to be body positive if you only use men’s opinions for validation like “boys like girls with curves” nah get that the fuck out of here